Tuesday, August 19, 2008

Houston, we have a problem!

I'm gonna be frank here...if you can't stand frankness...it's time to flip out and go look at someone else's pretty pictures...

'Cause I have to admit the truth...share it with my online friends as such...*sigh* I think I'm becoming a vintage pattern junkie...no, no it's true...*hanging head in shame* because see today at work, I had my Flickr album open to my vintage pattern folder as I was surfing websites looking for more treasures...

And then tonight when I got home...these were in the mail:

Mail order pattern # 9020 - Size 20 1/2
From 1970's










Pattern Description:
One piece dress with two collars - semi-fitted dress with deep v-neckline with slightly rolled, notched collar set into v-neck, 3/4 length sleeves. Self dicket and belt. Or bias shawl collar tied in a bow knot. Above elbow length sleeves. Size 20, no copyright date - pattern is uncut and in factory folds.






Pattern Description:
Single breasted jacket and slim four-gore skirt. Curved seaming in jacket with vents in front seams. Notch collar, cut in one with jacket fronts, is faced and interfaced. Lined jacket has long set-in sleeves. Skirt has darts in front and three piece back; left size zipper closing. Size 22 1/2, copyright 1962 - pattern is uncut and in factory folds




Pattern Description:
Misses and Womens one piece dress - shift dress has lowered round neckline, fly front zipper closing, self fabric or purchased belt and topstitching trim...also collarless version with long set-in sleeves gathered into buttoned cuffs. Size 42, copyright 1965. Pattern is uncut and in factory folds





Pattern Description:
Shirtdress in Half Sizes - The pleated shirtdress with princess seaming has front button closing, notched collar, short set-in sleeves and optional purchased belt. Size 20 1/2 - pattern is uncut and in factory folds. Copyright 1973





Now I know there must be a 12-step program out there on some sewing board to free me from my addiction...or at least give me guidance on how to manage it...*sigh* but I have yet to find it! Instead I find like-minded souls like these on PR on the Vintage Pattern Board...people pointing me to more and more vintage pattern sites...encouraging me to sew these patterns...telling me how to look other places for vintage patterns and even pointing me to vintage sewing books...

What is a girl to do? How can I help but be encouraged in this new pursuit? Especially since I have had some success with transforming these vintage patterns into actual garments or using techniques from pattern instruction sheets to make new garments from my TNT patterns...

And all this has really done is make me want to call in sick tomorrow and sew up the mail order pattern lovely that came today...

So hello my name is Carolyn and I am a fabricaholic and vintage patternaholic...

34 comments:

  1. Dear Carolyn, the only solution is to get a bigger pattern drawer. I now have one dedicated to my vintage patterns! I keep thinking I might re-sell some of them but I like them all so much! Hi, my name is Susie, and I love vintage patterns.

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  2. Oh you poor thing. I will keep my eyes open for a local support group. In a city as big as New York, there's bound to be one, right?

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  3. Now really, Carolyn, all you are doing is letting those of us on the other side of the screen live vicarously through you! That and reminding us that we own a few of those vintage patterns whose siren call you've answered! Of course some of us own them because we inherited them from our mother who helped begin the fabriholic/patternholic tendencies. I'm not saying who these people are either...

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  4. sigh.. I saw your post and my immediate reaction was, "I want! I want!" Drool!

    Well, Carolyn, if you are serious about alleviating your addiction, I sincerely offer my apartment (3000 miles away! FREE of CHARGE!) as a refuge for your vintage pattern collection, where they will be out your sight and out of your mind (and in my sweaty little palms). I can even ration your access to them. Let me know and I'll send you my address! I'm always willing to help you out! LOL!

    Rose <--waiting for a certain hot place to freeze over..... (giggle)

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  5. You're not seriously expecting anything but encouragement to continue your addictions from us lot are you?!

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  6. This is very. very. serious. At least you are past the first step of denial. Gorgeous patterns by the way!

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  7. No surprise here! Good for you - I think this is a great addiction to have. A larger pattern size vintage collection is a great thing - those sizes are harder to find and therefore more valuable! Just having them is cool, plus they must take up less space than fabric, right?;)

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  8. I see you're getting lots of help here LOL...a larger pattern drawer should be just the thing :-)

    I love the first pattern and look forward to seeing it made up - you do such lovely work ! For a newbie like me, it's all eye-candy.

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  9. Oh honey, I'm sure there are lots of folks out there who would love to help you with your addiction. By purloining some of your fab patterns! :D

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  10. Carolyn, I have 5 moving boxes full of these gems...from the 30's to the 70's. They call to me daily, but I've yet to succumb. You actually have been an enabler, as I've seen several patterns on your blog that I have then gone and ordered for myself. You always seem to find just the one I have to have...so, I do not offer any sympathy, but we'll go down this path to ruin together!

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  11. Why do I have this lil urge to buy patterns, I checked a few sites, and not really feeling the patterns, Why o' Why am I feeling compelled to try my hand at a vintage pattern...lol

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  12. Here is how I see it. If you are paying between $1 to $5 for your patterns then it's not even worth mentioning. You might find you'll run into storage problems though because at that price then you can really stock up.
    BUT
    If you are paying $10-$40 apiece(and people do pay that and more). THEN you have a problem. Shall we say highly probably bankruptcy?!? LOL....

    I think you will chose what is best for you. LOL.

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  13. I think is allowable. Seriously :) The details and technique that go into older patterns is unmatched. The sewing books of yesteryear are phenomenal (I still keep the one you sent me by my bed to read at night).

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  14. LOL...I'm not sayin' a Word. Not One. Because everytime I open your blog I see "Marji, don't say anything.."

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  15. Carolyn, you are going through something I went through when I first started buying vintage patterns a few months ago. I just bought some small drawers and organized them. I haven't bought too many lately, though. I agree with Summerset, the larger sized are harder to come by and are a great investment, especially over some of the modern ones that are very trendy. Love your newest ones!

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  16. You're in such good company, why would you want to leave us? Love that McCalls 6485 - the jacket is adorable. And how can you resist, anyway - you're all about the details, and the details on these older patterns are so much better. Think of them as an investment.

    Or however you have to think of them to justify their continued purchase.

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  17. If you can't bea'em, join 'em ...and enjoy!

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  18. I just want to know where the heck you are FINDING those sizes? I look and I look and I don't seem to find them. You are one dedicated (or lucky) gal to be able to sniff them out!

    Welcome to the Vintage Side, my friend. When I first told you about my love of vintage patterns, what? 10 years ago or so now?, I didn't think you'd EVER see the light (or is that darkness?)!! I am just giddy with delight that you have FINALLY come over to "our side." *laugh*

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  19. LOL. Hey, since I've been reading your blog and others I've joined the fabriholics club too. I can understand your addiction to vintage patterns too. Just haven't joined you yet. But, I don't blame you those patterns are perfect for you.

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  20. Why not have fun with it? You deserve it! And we out here in cyberland love to see what you make out of your patterns. Go for it!

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  21. My kids don't get it and my husband just sighs, but I am happy to see another addict out there. Vintage patterns are better, they have cooler details...I see we are competing for the same ones. Now whenever I see sold out in my size, I'll know who got there first!

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  22. Oh my goodness I love that 9020 pattern from the 70s!!!! I can't look too hard though. So far I've only acquired vintage patterns by accident. Don't need to start getting them on purpose.

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  23. Thanks for sharing the pictures of the patterns you found, I love to look at them and have browsed around quite a bit already thanks to you and others writing about those vintage patterns. See your collection as investment and enjoy.

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  24. Hello, my name is Marjie and I'm a fabricoholic. It's been 2 weeks since my last purchase, but only 2 hours since my last browsing....

    But, I don't think you need a 12 step program; after all, this is why you create such lovely items!

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  25. Do you really want a cure? I think most sewers are collectors - I am certainly no exception! My only rule now is that I will only buy vintage patterns I am actually going to sew - no more collecting just for the sake of it. I especially LOVE that first pattern - it's a real stunner!

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  26. for some reason I don't think you REALLY want an intervention! lol

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  27. Hi, my name is Lorraine and I am a fabricaholic and vintage patternaholic (y'all can see my latest Lanetz Living haul on my blog or my flickr.)

    Size 20 huh? Well I am just going to be an full on enabler and keep my eye out for sharp Carolyn-like vintage patterns for you.

    hee hee hee

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  28. I am right there with you. Thing is that these patterns are just so interesting to work with, and you keep learning more the more you sew them. And it's cool to touch other sewers and other times by sewing what they made. Keep it up, you are inspiring us all.

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  29. My Mom spent all those years warning me about choosing right kind of friends. I just didn't know she was warning me about other pattern addicts. I fell victim (poor me!)to a 1962 McCall pattern, and I'm taking a break right now as I carefully trace it and reform it into those perfect factory folds. It's the ideal pattern for knocking off a Betsey Johnson dress the DD and I admired. Ours will better. ;-) http://preview.tinyurl.com/67pnm3

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  30. Ohhh, those patterns are FAB!!
    (And don't tell anyone, but I think I'm becoming addicted too...)

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  31. Well, your not going to get tons of help from me... I used to work at a fabric store and could bring home all the discontinued patterns for free....
    But to be honest... if you really want to go in the less is more direction... think about it this way! If you spend less time shopping/buying vintage patterns, you will have more time/$ to sew!
    Think about it.... it could work!
    Good Luck!
    In the mean time, keep up the good work... writing your blog! It's great!
    Jean

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  32. The only thing worse than buying them on-line - finding vintage patterns in the thrift stores - at 10 cents each! - of course an armful (or two) had to come home with me!

    Hmmmm, bigger pattern drawers......
    And to think it all began so simply only a few months back when I stumbled in to the Dress-A-Day blog. And now I find I am not alone!!!!
    Patti

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  33. I just have to weigh in. After completely organizing and cataloging my pattern collection by company, then decade.... I have found that the Simplicitys have totally gotten out of hand. I transferred four bankers boxes into an old bureau of them and the little hogs, wanted more room. I gave my big envelope Vogues their very own box, you know how they love exclusivity while the smaller envs and Buttericks are hanging out. The Advance and Mailorders are old friends and they get to share, while the continental upstarts like Burda and New Look are living with the independants (Silhouettes, Cutting Line). I gave Kwik Sew and Stretch & Sew their own place but S&S does have to share some room with a few oversized no-names.

    Of course this takes all the storage space in my guest room, but like fish, guests tend to smell after three days anyway and my patterns have seniority.

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