Wednesday, February 05, 2014

All My Linings...

It's wintertime here...seriously cold, seriously snowing...seriously winter!  I spent a lot of the last holiday weekend sewing with wools.  When I sew with a wool I always add a lining.  For several reasons ~ to prolong the life of the garment, to make sure the wool doesn't irritate or scratch and sometimes to add warmth and weight to a garment.

Because of that I've been digging deep into my linings stash...well also I need to refresh my bemberg lining stash...it's that time of the year again. However, that need is allowing me to be a little adventurous with linings that I'm kinda loving.  You know you don't need to add only a rayon bemberg or solid silk colored lining to a garment...sometimes adding a print or a stripe to the inside of your garment really makes it fun & interesting!

For the several of the recently completed garments I've used polyester charmeuses that have been stashed f-o-r-e-v-e-r from Fabric Mart...




...don't they just give the inside of the garments a funky and fresh kinda feel?!

Then after rambling through the lining drawers, I found a silk batiste that I'd been hoarding to use with one of the Liberty of London prints that I bought from fabric.com several years ago.  At first I put it back thinking, need to save this, but then I thought I can always order more, right?  So it went into the maize colored wool crepe dress.



Warmth is another concern...especially this winter...so I've taken some of my satin linings and added them to my pants.  Not only does this mean that the underlining in the pants are silkier and easier to slide on and off but the heavier satin adds warmth to the pants.  I can take a lighter weight wool that I love and add a slightly heavier lining to it and get a great wearing warmer pair of pants than normal.


(used in the gray pinstriped pants)

(heavy satin lining used in the faded plaid pants)

So when you're thinking about lining a garment, think outside the box.  Don't just grab a solid colored rayon bemberg or silk, try something different to add some spice to your garment.  However, can I also add a warning to this...please make sure that the fabric you choose to line/underline with will withstand your day to day wearing and won't pull or wear out.  Personally I don't use china silk in my pants for this reason - it's shelf life is just too short for the amount of time I put into sewing my garments.  I also shy away from georgettes or other flimsy fabrics because I prefer a fabric with a shiny hand to assist with making the garment easier to slide on and off your body.

If you're unsure about what fabrics to use to line a garment, Claire Shaeffer's, Fabric Sewing Guide - 2nd Edition, has an entire section on lining techniques, as well as, a very detailed and well explained listing of lining fabrics. Personally I believe this book should be in every sewist's bookcase because it's a wonderful resource.

However, if you've never added any funkiness to the inside of your garment, I highly recommend that you give it a try!

Finally, when I was rooting around in my lining drawers, I found loads of 3/4 yard and 1 yard scraps that I haven't been able to let go of...does anyone else have these?  I've been wondering what I should do with them?  They are too big to throw away so I packed them back up but I'm thinking I should come up with a use for them.  Any suggestions would be appreciated.

...as always, more later!





29 comments:

  1. The lining in the sleeves of a jacket doesn't have to match what you use for the body. They each use around 3/4 yard.

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  2. Cool linings, along the same lines as awesome lingerie that only you are aware of. Neat!

    Remnant lining bits could be quilted into, oh, I don't know, something. If cutting and re-sewing fabric, to make more fabric, was your thing. Clearly not mine!

    You could use them inside bags - like the ones from Dogundermydesk or Nicolemdesign. Or use them as gift bags, especially good for bottles of wine ; )

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  3. I love your use of linings -- I've been in a lining quandary-- somehow buying linings that are ridiculous with the outer fabrics -- and yes, my goto is Bemberg although I understand it's not the most environmental friendly in its manufacturing process. I love your linings. For the one yards -- I would think maybe a short skirt, skort or shorts might be fun to line.

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  4. I am a fabric miser so I often use more than one color of lining in a garment, those little half yard pieces never go to waste :) and I so agree with you about the heavy satin linings they really do the trick to add some warmth and body to a fabric.

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  5. I like to line all my dresses and skirts (with the exception of knits), for a summer dress its usually a cotton/silk but for winter I like something a little heavier like a satin. I haven't tried lining pants yet, but should definitely try so it adds that extra warmth factor. I also like to look at funky linings - it's so much fun, even if you are the only one that sees it. Love your lining :-)

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  6. I have lots of linings in the stash and hopefully some of those will see the light of day soon. With the remnants how about piecing them together in a top?

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  7. Thanks for the book recommendation!

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  8. I love your linings! I use many different printed silky fabrics to add that unique funkiness to jackets and vests. I have a nice little pile of them for when I start making jackets and vests for myself.

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  9. Along with Kathie's comment about lining sleeves not matching the body, you can also line just the sleeves of a jacket.

    I see bag and bag linings mentioned already, what about pocket linings? Make scarves or headbands /wraps? Fabric jewelry? There's a necklace where you make a fabric tube, slip in a big wood bead, tie a knot, another bead, another knot....and add a closure, or if long enough, simply tie the ends. Or fabric flowers. Or make thin spagetti tubes to embellish a plain garment. Or.....

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  10. Good blog topic Carolyn. Like others, I often use up scraps to line the sleeves of jackets. Who really cares if they are different from the body?

    Karen

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  11. I'm with Beth and others who said use the scraps for a composite lining. As long as the weights are compatible and the result pleasing to your eye why not? This post is about venturing outside the box with linings.

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  12. I'm in the camp that uses different linings in the same garment. I'm on a zero-waste kick since I read on the Timo's blog that industry averages 85% or better cutting efficiency.
    http://zerofabricwastefashion.blogspot.com

    Since then, I weigh my fabric before cutting and the scraps afterward to check my efficiency. I know that sounds obsessive, but I'm a scientist and I wanted to see how home sewing compares to commercial scale sewing. I'm also very concerned about using the embedded water and energy in materials optimally. (My efficiency is generally 70-80%.)

    http://badmomgoodmom.blogspot.com/2012/07/embedded-water-cotton.html

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  13. I like funky linings too. I am wearing a yellow coat right now with a silk Anna Sui print charmeuse for the lining. Remember that sale at Fabric Mart?
    Why not use the smaller pieces for sleeve linings in jackets? Menswear often has a different lining in sleeves. No one really sees it and if it's a complimentary color than so much the better.

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  14. There's nothing like a party-girl-lining to brighten a dreary winter's day!

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  15. "All My Linings" made me giggle....

    I'm not very good at "making" fabric (a la Diane Ericson), but I sure can see using different bits of linings for sleeves, etc. Have fun!

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  16. Bags. Use the smaller pieces of fabric to make simple tote bags -- v. useful for sorting and storing notions.

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  17. Those linings, nothing short of gorgeous, you are my inspiration.

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  18. I make totes and zipper pouches, and I've used lining fabric like what you've described in totes and pouches. I made an insulated bag for groceries out of some turquoise denim I got at Goodwill and along with the insulating batting I lined it with some (probably cheap) satin I also got from Goodwill. Makes a great bag to carry ice cream when it's 95 degrees out.

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  19. Wild linings are a fun little secret us sewists can privately enjoy. Love them! How about some infinity scarves for those scraps?

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  20. Pockets, Carolyn! I have two tote trays of short yardage of crazy cotton, silk, and lining pieces just for pockets! Also, if the piece is the right shape, you can use it for the inside of a waistband, assuming, of course, it is pieced and not simply folded over. It really reduces bulk.

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  21. I *lurv* funky linings - it makes wearing the garments that much more fun! Unfortunately, most in my stash are plain bembergs, so until they're used up, that's what I'll be putting in garments! As for the remnants, I'll keep more stable (read: NOT bemberg) larger pieces for waistband facings, pockets, flys, bias binding, or contrast possibly sleeve lining if the pieces are large enough.

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  22. I never give much thought to choosing a lining fabric. I just use whatever I have on hand at the moment that matches or comes close to what I need. I may take the plunge and trying adding some fun linings to a few skirts for the spring and summer sewing.

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  23. I love luxurious linings, too. Sometimes I spend more on the lining than I do on the fashion fabric! It just feels so great, and it's like having a secret.

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  24. Carolyn - You're a veritable genius! Those linings are absolutely perfect and look great with the fabrics you've paired them with. It's things like this that make me a bit envious of those of you who have real season changes. Then I think about getting snowbound and all the ice and seriously cold weather and I get over it real quick. It's why I chose to move to South Florida. Stay warm.

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  25. Thanks for the lovely show and tell and reminder about what to do with many of those great freebees from FabricMart we all have Carolyn! The warmth of the iron, the steam and the pressing make the sewing chamber such a cozy (and productive) place to be when I can't, or just don't want to go out in the freezing weather, snow and ice.

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  26. I line the majority of my garment with either Sun Silky and have even used cotton voile for summer skirts. I do not use Bemsilk as I find that it just doesn't withstand the longevity of the main garment. I need to keep my eyes open for the patterned fabrics for lining, they are not always that available.

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  27. Why not use your lining odds and ends for linings with seams that show? I call it color-blocking on the inside of the garment!

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  28. I made a dressing gown from scraps--very silky and lux-feeling.

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  29. Carolyn, you mentioned having bought one of your linings at a Jomar shop on a trip to the Philadelphia area. My friend Jayne and I get to some of the Jomar stores quite frequently. Please let me know if there is anything you would like me to get for you. Which Jomar location did you visit? There are several.

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