Wednesday, August 07, 2013

Tell me...

Do you ever think the good results you achieve are more luck than skill? Do you ever question whether you've actually got the goods or that you're skating on a wing and a prayer?

Honestly, sometimes I wonder if I'm really as good as the pictures look or am I just getting by?  I wonder if I'm actually skilled or if I've just walked this road so many times, that my experience pulls a rabbit out of a hat when I'm in a sticky situation?

I wonder...do you ever wonder?


+ + + + +

Have you ever thought about about how many items you touch during the making of a garment?  I mean besides your sewing machine and your iron?  I was finishing up the Red Cotton Eyelet Dress and while reaching for the hem to press a tricky area of the dress, realized it was the third pressing tool that I'd used.  So I stopped to count and this was what I came up with...

4 pressing tools - my clapper, my sleeve board, my medium pressing ham, silk organza pressing cloth
3 pairs of scissors - my duckbill, my 8" gingher shears, my paper cutting scissors
3 spools of thread - red for the dress shell, tan for the lining, a blue that I used for the basting
2 measuring tools - my clear 18" ruler and my 6" seam gauge
2 tracing tools - yellow carbon paper for darts and tracing wheel
2 pinning tools - needle to baste with and pins, pins and more pins

That's 16 tools to make one dress and that's not including the sewing machine, the serger, the iron & ironing board and my computer.

So have you ever counted? It's definitely eye-opening!


+ + + + + 

Hand sewing ~ 
I used to think of it as a four letter word.  I avoided it whenever I could.  But lately I've come to think of it as a soothing exercise, something that gives me control over areas of my garment and also allows me to connect with the garment in a tactile way.

There's actually quite a bit of hand sewing in all of my garments now.  
  • If an embellishment is added, it's hand basted in...giving me not only control but acccuracy in placing the embellishment on the garment. 
  • All linings are hand stitched to the zipper tape.  I know there are other methods of machine stitching the lining to the garment, I just like the control and effect that hand stitching provides.
  • My hems are all hand stitched. I can actually work the blind hem feature on my sewing machine.  I just like hand stitching them down.
  • I've done more hand sewing/stitching this year.  It feels very "couture" to be stitching pieces of my garments using a needle and thread.
Do you add hand stitching/basting in your garments?  If so, why?  Does it calm you? Or do you avoid hand stitching like the plaque?

These are just a few of the thoughts running through my mind this past weekend as I immersed myself in my latest garments.  So these are the Questions of the Day.  Talk back to me...answer one, two, all or none of the questions above.  Because I was just wondering if others think the same thoughts that I think when I'm in the midst of a project...trying to get to the other side!


...as always more later!

56 comments:

  1. I prefer hand sewing in a lot of areas. Necklines, Hems, applying zippers. Some details are just better hand sewn.


    http://www.etsy.com/shop/CurvyTiffy?ref=listing-shop-header-item-count

    ReplyDelete
  2. I find there is SO much to know with sewing and/or patternmaking and designing. It just never seems to end, once you master one thing, there are plenty more techniques and designs that you have no idea what to do with.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'm the pressinatrix' biggest fan. I have a bin of pressing tools in different shapes for different areas.

    I keep way too many things "just in case" I need them. But, I'm always glad I have just the right thing already in my collection when I need them. Truly, I need to pare back a bit.

    If I were to follow the instructions on the patterns, I don't think my results would be anywhere as good. I have decades of experience and perhaps a dozen teachers IRL (and more on the internet) who have guided me to where I am now.

    FWIW, I do hand sew sparingly and don't resent the time spent. In some situations, it is the only way to derive the control I need. I knit most of my sweaters and that takes way more time than a little hand basting.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Sewing is definitely an expensive proposition! I think that is why it can be so frustrating for beginners. Embroidery just requires some fabric, a needle, and some thread, And knitting only takes a couple of pointy sticks and some yarn.

    I never really thought about how many different “tools” I use for any single project, but it is a lot!

    And hand sewing is my absolute favorite. Basting and hems are definitely worth the extra time for me.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Interesting questions. I never mistake anything I do for skill because I have not sewn enough to acquire any skills. But you are undoubtedly skilled--experience has taught your fingers and eyes how to do what you do and do it well, so if something new comes along you can concentrate all your attention on it.

    I would add to your list of tools used on every project my tweezers, without which I can't thread any needle, hand or machine! And did you really get through the whole dress without using your seam ripper?

    ReplyDelete
  6. Some successes are certainly luck, but when I compare my older home made clothes to my newer ones I can see there is an improvement there, so there must be a bit of skill involved!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I think we know a lit more that we think we know so I DuPont think luck plays too much if a part. Doubting oneself it's human nature. You are such an inspiration to many of us that it's refreshing to know you have a few doubts yourself

    ReplyDelete
  8. I believe its my skills...I often look at some of the bags I created when I first started sewing and they are very different; you can see my skills have clearly evolved...I learn a lot about sewing and still have a lot to learn...but since I have been sewing, if I come to a snag I know exactly what to do to fix it...Im getting better and better daily...one day I can be called a SEAMSTRESS...:)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Interesting thoughts. I have learnt so much during the 20 months I have been sewing that I know when my skills are improving and it is "me" and when my skills are lacking and I can't do something. Then I learn it. I guess when you have been sewing so long you may start to question yourself. Think back to when you started sewing and you will realise that it is your skill.

    And yes - I love my tools.

    ReplyDelete
  10. And I want to add to that. Look at your work through a newbie's eyes. I have often thought - jeeze I wish I had an experienced sewist with me.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Re: Luck v skill - I often think it comes down to luck for me. When I sew a pattern for the first time and it works perfectly, then the second time (when I should know how it all fits together) but something goes wrong and it doesnt turn out so well!

    I have also come around to hand sewing more recently. I used to avoid it as much as possible. I recently decided to underline a dress and spent two episodes of Project Runway just hand basting the fashion fabric pieces to the underlining pieces. It was so relaxing!

    ReplyDelete
  12. If we are avid seamstresses, we will fine tune our skills and advance in our abilities over time.

    I will hand baste tricky material pieces together. I believe it is easier to sew it w/ the machine after it is hand basted. I also will hand sew many of my hems on the clothing I make. It looks better IMO.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I've become a hand sewing advocate, too. I learned to appreciate hand sewing by watching Susan Khalje's TV show. She always talked about the control you have with hand sewing and she was right. Plus, it is very relaxing (most of the time).

    ReplyDelete
  14. I've been sewing for nearly 50 years and all I can think of is that I should be a lot better at it than I am. I don't have a lot of patience sometimes, and that is the reason for a lot of my failures. Sometimes things just go together more easily than others and make me look better at it than I am. When I see what the professionals do, I wonder how many "takes" it took to get that perfect garment, or did it work the first time? Anyway, this is one of the primary reasons I only sew for myself, my daughters, and my sister in law. I would never, EVER! sew for anyone for money. NEVER.

    ReplyDelete
  15. AS they say, " a carpenter is only as good as his tools" and I agree. We need these tools to pull off professisonal results.

    I, too, detested hand sewing at one time but now see it's importance and worth. Sewing velvet taught me to appreciate a well basted seam.

    As far as luck, never think about it. I have been sewing too many years to have that conversation. But when it comes to skills I am ALWAYS learning. There are always techniques to be improved and new ones to learn. Fabrics and styles change and we need to be open to learning what is needed to make them look their best. Sewing is a constant personal evolution, IMO.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I used to point with pride at garments that I had made that had no hand stitching at all in them. Anything to avoid sitting there hand-stitching! Nowadays (maybe thanks to Phllis' influence) I enjoy the "time out" aspect of hand-stitching. Except during that dreadfulheatwave last month, when I wanted nothing on my lap! :)

    ReplyDelete
  17. It's so funny that you asked these questions, it's the same conversation I had with myself on Sunday. I was making a fitted peplum blouse that required a lot of alterations. I had read Pattern Review, and expected to adjust the darts. I read you, so I had decided to add piping on the neckline and arm openings. I took a class, and bought an invisible zipper foot, and inserted it right on the first try. I used my Stitch Nerd pressing hams to get the pressing done, so the pressinatrix would approve. I didn't use all the tips from the Susan Kahlje Craftsy class, but I did use wide seam allowances on the side seam, just in case. I had just the right thread to topstitch, in the thread cabinet that came with my new Koala Studio. We learn so much from each other, it's just fun when it all comes together, and you have a garment you know you couldn't have made a short time ago. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Most of my sewing is more triumph of will over skill.

    As for the tools, well, as I sit at my work desk in my office/sewing room and glance over to the sewing closet, the sewing cabinet with machine and serger, the ironing board (never put away), the various rulers pinned up on the wall...let's just say you are correct about the number of tools used in sewing.

    And I tend to hand sew hems and other areas where I want to have a more invisible or controlled finish. I'm also a big fan of hand basting tricky parts before machine stitching.

    ReplyDelete
  19. This is why my garments don't get much wear. They look homemade because I don't take the time to use the iron or do any hand sewing. I do not have many of the tools you mentioned. I only use the sewing machine and now I realize that I must use other tools to make a garment that does not look homemade. Thanks for the many tips you gave in this one post.

    ReplyDelete
  20. I see myself improve with each garment, but, yes, I often wonder if they are really good and when people ask if I made it (because they know I sew) I wonder if it really shows! And, I really enjoy hand sewing more and more -- always hems unless it is super casual, often hand pricked zippers, and in a tricky situation I'd rather hand baste than risk having to do it more than once.

    ReplyDelete
  21. It takes time to build a tool kit. When I think about what I had as a beginner; just a tape measure, scissors and a seam ripper. And boy did that seam ripper get a work out!
    And I think it's GREAT that you use so many of the tools you have in the toolbox.
    20 years ago I thought hand sewing was 'downmarket' and used to try to get every inch of a garment made with my machine. But I can now see the quality in handmade. I always hand stitch the lining to my zipper too, and currently I'm making an incredibly simple dress for my friend but I've chosen to hand stitch all the French seams by hand. The finish is much nicer, even if it takes longer.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I wish I liked hand sewing, but no dice. I do it when necessary, but I don't find it relaxing or comforting. Instead, it makes me want to stab someone (I'm a cranky sewer).

    After 11 years of sewing, I find that my judgment is a lot better. Which is different than hand-to-eye sewing skill. I can now look at a pattern or some instructions and I'm able to make a judgment about whether something is going to work or not without making up the garment first. My judgment isn't perfect - I just made a dress where the sleeves were WAY too long, despite shortening them before I put them in, but in general, I can spot a pattern marking mistake or some other problem before I commit to it.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Put me in the camp of avoiding hand sewing like the plague. :-) I know how to do it. I just don't like it. I also like the challenge of figuring out how to change construction a bit so that I can machine it all. But I do hand sew when I absolutely have to and then when I'm done, usually wonder why I thought it was going to take so long when it didn't. Hahaha.

    And, yes, love all my tools too, mostly because they make things easier/faster and I'm an impatient sewist. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  24. I love all aspects of sewing. I've been sewing for 55 years and it seems the hand sewing issue comes and goes. It was in vogue when I was in high school learning tailoring then became passe during the knit explosion of the 70s and 80s. For me, hand sewing is restful and cherishing the final completion of a garment. But I couldn't live without my tools!

    Karen

    ReplyDelete
  25. 1. Always thinking one or the other of 2 things....Wow, that was lucky that it turned out well OR I know what to do...why is it not working? So, I go both ways.
    2. I only work on one project at a time...upon finishing I put everything I used away so I can start fresh with a new project. I feel sometimes like geesh, did I really use all this. YEP!
    3. Not against hand sewing, will do it when I need to, but don't love it.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Skill + Vision. Or rather, I think that there are two types of skills involved. First, the practical sewing skills, developed with experience. Second, well, an ability with spacial relationships - in essence - a kind of applied mathematical skill. (This is one example of why the girls-are-not-good-at-math is bunk! ) Seriously, it take some ability to envision and create good fit, assemble a complex pattern well, and generally make it all work. (However, I tend to think that skill of both kinds are best exemplified in the execution of a simple appearing design.) Patience and focus help too, of course!

    That said, Carolyn, you excel at all of that! Luck, I contend, is really the result of an accumulation of experience and skills, including those inborn skills of visualization, and the ability to execute the project accordingly. I'm hoping to get there some day -- thanks for the inspiration!

    ~Jen

    ReplyDelete
  27. Luck, determination and my dear departed mother all get me through. And good tools and good iron and imagination and a pinch of rashness. But I can't say my pictures look better than my skills!

    ReplyDelete
  28. My tool check list is pretty similar to yours - good tools help achieve good results. And I do like hand sewing because it helps me be productive while sitting on the couch in the evening when I wouldn't normally be sewing.

    Yes, every so often I feel like I know nothing, too. But then I realize that things I once struggled with - like setting in a sleeve or installing a zipper smoothly or sewing darts with no bubble at the end - are now things that are normal sewing tasks for me. So, I must be getting better at the sewing part of sewing. As for the fitting... well, I'm still working on that skill...

    ReplyDelete
  29. My friend (who is visiting) and I were talking about slow sewing yesterday as we worked in the studio. I don't think what we achieve is luck. I think it's taking the time to do the best of our ability at each and every step and in the process (over years of doing that) growing our skill set and skill level and ending up with better and better produced pieces. Part of that equation includes having the tools to do what we need to do. Good tools, not just get by ones.

    ReplyDelete
  30. I've come to love, appreciate and ABUSE my iron. I have yet to break open my tailor's ham (scared of sleeves). lol

    I really want to start more hand sewing on my garments but just not neat enough yet (practice makes perfect but I'm still scared to start). Just started making buttonholes (SOOOOOO much easier than I thought)...next on to sleeves.

    I love your garments. They always show your personal style and fit you perfectly . You have your aesthetic down pat (plus, I'm always AMAZED at your use and placement of extras--binding, etc.)!

    ReplyDelete
  31. Sometimes it is faster to sew by hand. Sometimes it is far more secure to sew by hand. I like hand sewing. I am also grateful for my machines (speed, preservation of sight, no bleeding fingertips, etc. etc.)

    ReplyDelete
  32. I think that what I call "luck" is many sewing struggles and learning experiences finally coming together. It's such a nice feeling when that happens! I enjoy a hobby (more of a passion) that has so many learning experiences available. I do remember that feeling of total frustration that I had when I started sewing. The feeling comes occasionally, but passes quickly now. I never thought about how many tools I use in a garment. It really is amazing. I use your tool list and would add an awl, a seam ripper, and probably more. I'll have to pay more attention!! As for hand stitching, I did consider it a four letter word. Now, I use hand stitching more and more as I attempt to improve the quality of my garments. I use the stitching time to catch up on TV episodes or movies.

    ReplyDelete
  33. "I wonder if I'm actually skilled or if I've just walked this road so many times, that my experience pulls a rabbit out of a hat when I'm in a sticky situation?" Aren't these the same thing? And really, wasn't it luck (bad) that got you in that sticky situation and skill ("...my experience pulls the rabbit out of the hat...) that got you out?

    I've been sewing for a little more than 50 years, but it is only in the last 10 years that I have really improved my skills. I've always sewn to improve fit (as a young teen because I was too tiny to find stylish clothes that fit, and now because I'm too large and odd-shaped). But it's only in the last 10 years that that I've learned other-than-slapdash techniques for doing alterations such as FBA. I've also improved my interior finishing considerably. That said, my garments never look as good inside as yours. I have used your blog for both inspiration and instruction.

    I always kept my ironing board out when sewing, but it was not until I read the Pressinatrix that I really understood how to use them to get a more professional look. I almost always use my ham, often use a chunk of wood I stole from my husband's scrap box as a clapper, and use my (cheap, inadequate) sleeve roll, and have a wooden combo tool my husband made me that I don't really know how to use properly. It has a point presser that I really don't understand, and lots of curves and shapes that are useful, but hard to get to. I know if I used it more often I would get more comfortable with it. I guess that will be my next challenge.

    I've always done most hems by hand, just because I think they look better. I've begun hand-basting more often, especially where seams intersect, in order to get more accurate placement. Do I enjoy hand sewing? Eh, I neither like nor dislike it. I do enjoy many aspects of sewing, especially the brain-work of turning 1-dimensional fabric and pattern into 3-dimensional shapes as I choose, but there is always a utilitarian aspect for me. It is the finished object, always the result of solving a 3-dimensional puzzle, that gives me the greatest joy. I forget who I'm paraphrasing, but I don't enjoy sewing as much as I enjoy having sewn.

    ReplyDelete
  34. You've got skills, my friend. There's no doubt about it, and not just "dumb luck". Your garments look amazing because they're expertly made, making YOU the expert! As for tools, I saw a marked improvement in my garments when I started using the right ones. It's funny to think of, but you're right, we do touch/use quite a few in the process! And finally, in regards to hand-stitching... once my stitches stopped looking like a 4 yr old made them, I didn't mind doing it as much. And, I got faster at it, so it didn't take me as long to do as it used to!

    ReplyDelete
  35. But isn't it experience that provides one with the skill that enables one to pull the rabbit out of the hat? Isn't that what skills are? An ability gained and perfected with experience? So, yes, you are skilled and yes, you do skate on a wing and a prayer because you are always expanding and improving on your skills by trying new things. And dayum woman, you are GOOD! so wonder no more.

    ReplyDelete
  36. An expert is "a person who has extensive skill or knowledge in a particular field." When you've been sewing for years and years (40+ in my case), you tend to pat yourself on the back when things go right. With a hearty "Damn, I'm good," thrown in. LOL Sometimes it's luck, but most of the time it's skill we take for granted. Hence why we question ourselves sometimes.

    I never thought about the number of tools I touch in a project, but the number of times I'm headed to the ironing board is noted.

    I too use to HATE hand sewing. I have garments hanging in my sewing room now that need a simple button sewn on or a hem stitched down. Which is weird because I do enjoy the relaxation of hand sewing. Though I do tend to stress over getting the stitches the same length and the thread not showing from the right side. Every July in our Couture group we have Hand Stitching 1 and 2. I've learned all kinds of cool stitches. Now I need to put them into practice.

    ReplyDelete
  37. I DEFINITELY get by on a wing and a prayer. I'm waiting for the day that my skills catch up with my ambition. I get lucky sometimes. You, on the other hand, are super skilled. Don't doubt that!

    ReplyDelete
  38. (1) Right now I am pretty sure my sewing is about a 50/50 mix of luck and skill. Though I suppose it does depend on the project. Skating costumes - I have a bit more faith in my skills, but sewing regular clothes... there is a good bit of luck involved in getting out something I like to wear.

    (2) I know I use a TON of tools to make a garment. I was going insane when I had to move all of my sewing stuff out of my apartment - I didn't have easy access to a lot of my most often used tools and I felt like I was missing an arm. I recently added some new tools (pattern weights, and some curved rulers) which are quickly becoming must-use tools for me.

    (3) It is funny because I always put off hand sewing, but I actually find it soothing while I am doing it. I mostly use it for hems and linings, but I am looking forward to making an awesome coat with pad stitched hair canvas and lots of internal hand stitching. I also use it a lot for embellishments, but those are mostly on skating costumes.

    ReplyDelete
  39. I'm always amazed when anything I sew turns out since I've not been able to be consistent in practicing my craft. I'm sure there are angels, elves, and Lady Luck every step of the way!
    I enjoy hand sewing hems and zippers. Yeah it kinda sucks when you want to hurry up and be done, but it's usually done before I know it.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Love this post! It's never actually occurred to me how much stuff I use to make a garment. I should consider it. I do often feel like I'm flying by the seat of my pants. But, I can assure you, you are not! When I've been sewing for as many years as you, I tell myself I'll feel confident in my skills :-)

    ReplyDelete
  41. Like you, I do my hems by hand. I enjoy the extra control and the monotony; it can be soothing! I have inserted one zipper so far, and I handpicked it. I was really happy with the results and will be doing that as often as possible!

    ReplyDelete
  42. I find myself using more hand sewing than ever - I baste more for a long term quicker and better final result. As for a successful project being more luck than skill not so - my experience of what suits me both colourwise and stylewise combined with my life long skills development mean that 9 times out of 10 a garment or project works. Another factor is that I no longer regard making a muslin or playing with fabric etc a waste of time before the real project - it is part of the process and just as much fun.

    ReplyDelete
  43. Deep thoughts there Carolyn. Of course I wonder. Sometimes I ask my self can I really sew? Then there times that my confidence level is as high as the moon. Guess it all depends on the garment we are making a the time; and of course the fabric choice (which can give you a fit sometimes); and of course whether or not the pattern is drafted well.

    ReplyDelete
  44. My experience is that very rarely it's down to luck when you're talking a tactile skill. Be it drilling, be it cooking, be it sewing - practice makes the difference. That's not to say you can't have lucky successes :D

    ReplyDelete
  45. LOL- I just counted the number of measuring tools I used the other day when making a skirt- and it was 5! 6 if you include the seam allowance guides on the sewing machine. Crazy. Necessary for me.
    I prefer a hand hemmed garment, I must say- but it kills my neck and shoulder as I have to keep a fairly stiff posture to see my work under the magnifier. For embellishments I feel it is a must! I do love the look.
    Thank you, Carolyn- I really do enjoy yr blog, and your generous sharing of skill, craft and insight. Your work, especially over the last six months, has been very inspiring.

    ReplyDelete
  46. I have some skills; some I learned when young from school sewing lessons and a TV course in the 70s. Others I learned from pattern instructions, and lately the Internet. But when luck comes by at the right time, that's great too. And I have toooooools. How i love sewing tools! I set about learning sewing step by step and very thoroughly and deliberately, pacing myself and stretching myself. And I set about gathering tools step by step too. So it was economical and i use what i buy. I don't have so much fabric stashed but notions and tools....... Oh, yes!

    ReplyDelete
  47. I think the Internet is the best tool yet. Blogs such as yours, as well as YouTube and Craftsy courses, have upped my sewing game immensely in the past couple of years. I love hand sewing! I think patience is also something I've developed in my "later years" that has greatly improved my sewing. I always look forward to seeing your latest creations!

    ReplyDelete
  48. I love hand sewing now, it is an important part of a well made garment, and very relaxing. In my teenage years I sewed a lot of items with the emphasis on quick (cut it out one day and wear it the next) and my mother did all my hand sewing for me. I cringe when I think how terrible some of the things must have looked. I have spent a lot of years since then trying to acquire the tools of the trade and as much knowledge as possible, and I hope that I am sewing on a different level now. You definitely have skill to produce such well made, well fitting garments.

    ReplyDelete
  49. Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.... You are much more prepared with all that practice you've done over the years; so ofcourse luck favors you!

    I'm working on my preparation.

    ReplyDelete
  50. I love your blog posts. I am not a good "sewer" but have been trying to do better. Your blog really helps me learn new things. I am slowly getting better. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  51. Your lovely garments are made with BOTH skill and LOVE ... you can tell you love the craft of sewing by the end result. I envy you because you must be a fast sewer ... do you burn the midnight oil? All your outfits inspire me to hone my sewing skills. As for tools, sure, you could cook with a just pot and a spoon, but you'd soon get tired of the limitations. Same with sewing. More tools = more opportunities to build on your skills. Love your blog!

    ReplyDelete
  52. Thank you for sharing your process. Your posts are very informative and inspirational. Do you plan on taking votes for your fall wardrobe name this year?

    ReplyDelete
  53. did the epiphany about handsewing come when you were making that lace dress? :)

    i would say you are a magician, but not the kind that pulls rabbits out of hats. you'd be more like houdini than carrot top.

    ReplyDelete
  54. Off subject question: I was looking at your blogs about your twin set cardigans, and would like to ask how you did the contrast bands. Was there a band in the pattern, or did you work it out yourself? I'm about to embark on a cardigan marathon, with sweater knits ranging from light to rather heavy, so I'm wondering about whether/how to interface, especially with those wider bands. Thank-you! -wendy

    ReplyDelete
  55. This is an interesting question. I've never counted all the tools I use in the making of a garment, but when you itemize them out, it's a lot! People say I'm creative, but I think I'm more skilled than creative - I'm good at following Lego directions, but I can't build something out of the blue without guidance. Same for sewing. But I do think, in the absence of a lot of education and classes, that I'm learning as I go. Garments are much better made and fit much better than they did even 3 years ago. And you do have a LOT of skill. Practice makes perfect and putting in the hours must, too.

    ReplyDelete
  56. I just finished a western shirt for my daughter and have made 2 before. This is the first time I hand sewed the piping in, before I just pinned. It turned out much better. Even though it took longer, I am much happier with how it turned out. I love sewing tools, I'm a geek at heart. I'm always looking at what new tools are out there.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment! It is so appreciated.

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails