Saturday, April 24, 2021

What is an Influencer?

I haven't been sewing AT ALL this month and I've been staying away from social media because I'm challenged by the fact that quite a few sewists aren't their authentic selves.  So many are trying to be someone else and the unauthentic portrayals sadden me.

It's led me to contemplate "What is an Influencer" and "Who is a Real Influencer"?  Are you one because you get free stuff and talk about it?  Are you one because you've got a lot of followers? Are you one because you produce flashy reels and take great pictures? Is it because you've declared yourself a brand, so you're doing everything you can to make a name for yourself on the socials?


It makes me wonder "What happened to the Art"?  Because to me, sewing is an artform, just like knitting, quilting, etc.  At what point is it about the "fame" rather than the art?

Also as with all things in life, there's space for only so many at the top. What's so special about what you do that means you should be at the top of the pyramid?

My contemplation does not come from a place of jealousy and desire to be like others. I'm offered new collabs every week. I say no to 95% of them and the ones I do consider have to be something I truly believe in and want to do. Free stuff isn't free to me.  You have to put work into it, perform it on a timetable (that may or may not fit into my schedule) and add additional elements to the project that you may or may not be reimbursed for.

At my age, TIME is a commodity that I don't give away freely. So I've come to the realization that the word "Influencer" as it's used today doesn't reflect who I am. I'm also of a demographic where I can afford to finance my hobby because that's what sewing is - my hobby.  It's not a job.  It's not a springboard to a second career - it's my hobby.  As such, I take pride in the fact that with years of experience I do it well. BUT and this is important, it's there to provide entertainment, solace, creative challenges when I need it but it's not scheduled, regulated or required.

If I influence you to purchase something, it's because I've spent my hard earned money on the item first. I've bought fabric from the supplier and experienced what their shipping was like, their return policy, what the product actually looks like when it shows up at my home. If it's a sewing machine, I've sewn on that machine for years. I've upgraded from one version to another and I've gifted them to my sewing friends. I believe in the sewing machine company. Now just add those sentences to everything sewing related as well as the suppliers. 

I'm not suggesting you buy something because it was given to me free. I believe in the supplier/manufacturer/brand and I would use this product whether it was free or not. That's not what's happening in the online sewing world now. In my opinion, sewists are trying to get as much free stuff as possible so they can be in the "In Crowd."  I can count on my two hands the ACTUAL number of sewing influencers whose recommendations I would take because my criteria isn't based upon likes.  

My criteria is based upon:

- Can they actually sew?

- Are they learning to better their craft?

- Do their garments fit well or are they just photographed well?

- Do they have any actual fabric knowledge or are they just taking stuff because it's free?

- Do they understand why notions are important and why they're needed to perform a task?

- Is all of their knowledge YouTube/Internet based or have they actually read a sewing book?  Not all YouTube videos show you the correct techniques.

- Is this just a way to make them Social Media Famous?

Now I know the next question is ~ who do I consider a Social Media Sewing Influencer.  But you know what, that doesn't matter. What matters is that YOU the consumer should decide WHO you want to follow and WHY. If you only need pretty pictures to make you happy and encourage you to buy, then continue to follow and encourage the Influencer who does that for you. If you like reels, IGTV, YouTube videos or Facebook Group leaders and they influence you to buy or sew something, then follow them.

I'm addressing my thoughts and needs since you stopped by my sewing room to chat!

Lastly, I understand the need of an Influencer.  They point us to things we may not have considered. They show us suppliers, programs, pattern designers we may not have known. Most importantly most of them do promote the craft of sewing.

These are my thoughts on a Saturday afternoon, where the sewists who follow me on Instagram have influenced me to finish up a shirt I've been stalled on.



...as always more later!


71 comments:

  1. Amen Carolyn. Sometimes I wonder if it is an age thing--I think I'm around the same age as you are. I follow someone if I'm inspired by their skill and what they make and too many obvious ads (trying to be not obvious) turns me right off. It makes me sad that everything is commodified and monetized nowadays.

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  2. Agree. I continue to follow those who can actually sew and sew well. And have a similar aesthetic as mine or one I admire. And I appreciate all you do and letting us know of what you sew. Another great shirt with a border. You find the best border prints. Jean

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  3. I follow people for a variety of reasons - but the ones that I love are those who clearly love their hobby. I tend to be put off when I feel that their posts are essentially ads for things they've been 'given'. I do appreciate it when people outline where they have bought their fabric/pattern/notion/tools, as then I can find them myself if I feel it's warranted, but like you I want to know that what they are saying is genuine. I'm never going to be an Influencer - having a private Instagram account would rule that out! - but like to think that I can share what I do know about sewing via my blog and that hopefully my experiences with different patterns and fabrics will be helpful to others.
    YOU are one of the original sewing influencers, as far as I am concerned! Honest, upfront, highly skilled, your expertise shines through.

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  4. What a great read, and it could equally apply to pursuits other than sewing too. As I have only returned to sewing in the last few years it has taken me time to sort out who I want to follow, who is going to be useful to me, and yes - being authentic is key.
    J

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  5. I passed you on the street in the garment district a couple of years ago (definitely before covid). I recognized you but figured you didn't want to be bothered with random commentors. You looked happy and confident. Qualities you definitely have! I follow you for your creativity. Note your blouse today. I would never have figured out how to use that fabric. Nor would I have even bought it to begin with. Great job! I'm not your lifestyle type nor your figure type, but you have "influenced" me significantly. Ignore the others and please continue your great work

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    1. Anne - thank you for respecting my privacy. Many times when I'm headed to the garment district in the middle of the day, I'm on my lunch break with a limited amount of time. Now this is not to say that if you'd stopped me I wouldn't have talked to you because I recognize that sometimes people just want to say hi. However, I'm grateful that you thought about it before proceeding and if you ever see me again please say hello. I'd love to meet you!

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  6. This takes me back to your post about photos many years ago! Except the bar now for "good photos" is exponentially higher than back then. I"m happy when I see friends who are fat/queer/BIPOC etc get sponsorships that would have gone to think white women five years ago... but I definitely feel disconnected from the people at "the top" who become lifestyle influencers.

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    1. Gillian - I agree! I'm thrilled that the sewing suppliers have decided that there are more than skinny white sewists in the community. However, I still need there to be some skill, some love for the art, something more than a pretty picture. And I can't believe you remember the picture taking post!

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  7. thank you for posting this. I agree with you. I’ve quit following several when it became obvious they were all show and no skill.

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  8. I follow those from whom I can learn. I admire your blog, your adaptations of patterns and especially your creativity fabric pattern placement.

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  9. I love reading blogs of folks who also see sewing as art, and who construct amazing garments. Your blog is one of my favorites, and I'm always in awe of your masterful craftwork. :) So thank you for sharing with us all your knowledge & craft.

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  10. Carolyn this is right on the money. Pun not intended. Some days I feel like almost everyone is getting free stuff and all I’m seeing are ads. I follow people who personally inspire me for a variety of reasons. I’ve never gotten anything for free. I turned Minerva down when they offered. I’m not into that. It’s my hobby. It’s art as you say. I want it to be mine. I take crappy pictures with bad lighting in the woods with my camera propped on a stump. But it’s fun and I enjoy it and make them as nice as I can. It’s about sharing what I’ve made not talking anyone into anything. I’ve mostly stopped naming pattern companies and saying where I got the fabric abs what it is. If someone asks I’ll tell them but I don’t feel like I should be paying a company to be their free ad. Thanks for a post that happens to echo a lot of what I’ve been feeling lately. You are a sewist I respect. And part if that redirect comes because you aren’t trying to sell me something g. But most of it is because of you incredible talent and skill in sewing. Thanks again.

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  11. The chapter beginning with 'At my age...' really speaks to me Carolyn. At my age, time is indeed a commodity that I cherish. I want to be creative on my own schedule. Great post all round.

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  12. I suspect there are 1 or more specific people who have annoyed you with their pretensions and lack of genuine skill/knowledge at sewing? Those kind of influencer fakers have a stronger desire for fame and adulation than a true love and passion for the art of sewing. I ignore them, my only regret being that some of them may actually be turning off potential learners from finding out what a really satisfying and enjoyable hobby making your own clothes can be. The fakers promote products often more for their own benefit and profit rather than supporting newcomers with good quality information.

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  13. Totally agree with you. And they really annoy me pretending to be a good sewer and they are not. Money is what motivates them. I would love to understand how they make money from Youtube and how much they actually make. There is a plethora of inept and sometimes poorly presented youtubers masquerading as a sewer. Their skill level is negligible.

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  14. I totally agree with everything you said. so much on instagram is for the likes, the same aesthetic on photographs, just... meh. i lost interest in a lot of people about 3 years ago and have found it very hard to re-engage since.

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  15. I completely agree with you, Carolyn. I've previously unfollowed sewists who just write about their free gifts from fabric shops etc, with their perfectly-styled photos. To me, this isn't real. I want to know about the obstacles encountered along the sewing journey; the real life, not "IG life". I don't want the #ad #gift ramming down my throat at every opportunity, I just want to see garments that someone has taken time and care to make, even if it's not "IG perfect". Thank you, Carolyn, for another true blog post.

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  16. This is absolutely it. The very instant an influencer says “this fabric was given in return for a blog post, video” etc it is an instant turn off. I then assume that their content will be pure advertising (even if that was not their conscious intent filmed/written) the older I get the less tolerant I get. Sadly sewing vlogs/IG/blogs etc are becoming less about the craft and more advertising channels. .

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  17. You have said a mouthful. Thank you for authenticity and your amazing sewing skill.

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  18. Hi Carolyn, just want to say you are an influencer to me. I like what you sew, I like your pictures, I like your commentary. Always happy to see a blog post from you.

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    1. This. This right here is so true. I'm so tired of the phrase 'gifted in exchange' because if something is expected from a gift, it's not a gift.

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  19. Absolutely true!!! I have unfollowed more influendes who call themselves sewists as their writings and pics are only Watch me! Buy this! but I don't have any skills, I have been sewing for 3 months and getting paid for it.

    The blogs I follow are like yours. To see what you are sewing or dealing with lost of mojo for my own inspiration and motivation. To learn about now sources of supplies, etc.

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  20. Wow, you got ME again. As I have just returned to a job (one I am Loving) I have less sew-time for me. So I too have stopped following the glitzy blogs and stuck with the realistic-read my age shape and likes. You of course have led the pack. I have used your ideas to my benefit. Keep it up and as long as you take time your valuable time to inspire and educate me consider that I will be following you. Pegeth

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  21. Well said. Looking forward to the blouse finish. The print and drape look amazing.

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  22. You know what I will say, after reading through these comments... I"m glad that people are correctly identifying what was sent in return for work! I"m glad we are having a conversation about "there are too many ads" and not "I think this person is lying and this is really an ad they didn't disclaim".

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  23. Caroline, when you decide to comment on an issue you do it right. You write something thoughtful, well reasoned and explained, with good grammar, spelling and good flow. I like your sewing even though I am not in your size range/body type, because you demonstrate a creative use of fabric and always explain carefully how you got your results. I like to see that thought process. I only follow blogs that I enjoy and can learn from. Thank you for continuing your blog.

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  24. I follow two blogs: Diary of a Sewing Fanatic and Sunny Gal Studio Sewing. I am a paying member of Pattern Review. That is ALL. PR is all about none of the above, and same for you and Beth. I can’t be bothered with the rest. I know there are other unicorns out there, but I don’t have the time to sort through them, and don’t want the pitch. I’m 60 in a few days too, which is a factor here.

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  25. Wonderful post. I've been off Instagram for about 6 months. I listened to a podcast about how damaging social media is to us. What I realized (I'm mainly a quilter) is that I felt like everyone stuff (quilts etc..)was so much better then what I was doing. It totally wreak my own creativity, I was just copying someone else stuff : (
    Now I try to do my own things sometimes it looks weird but that's okay. Some of the "famous" antique quilts are the weird ones. We all have to embrace our own work. Good or bad it's okay it's got our own thumb print on it. And that is what is important.

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  26. Wow this was very good! Thank you for sharing your genuine insight!!

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    1. Desiree - thanks for the comment and the post to your stories on IG. I so appreciate that!

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  27. I dropped out of most social media sites quite some time ago. Too competitive, too self-aggrandizing and often too mean. I have stuck with the blogs and sites that jazz my creative jets. I like challenge so I have many hobbies. Fiber of any kind is as much a stimulant as my required high-octane coffee. Fabric all laid out in lovely "calling to me" stacks really gets my heart racing. Card making that utilizes minimalism, everything-but-the-kitchen-sink add-ons, as well as a wonderful mix of both is such a rush. People who love what they do and create accordingly are simply the best and THEY are my INFLUENCERS. I am into my seventh decade on this Earth and continue to find so much joy in living, learning and sharing. Thanks for a great post.

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  28. Ideas are one thing, selling me stuff is totally another thing. It may be my age or my sense of having limited time, but please don't try to sell me something. I may use your suggestions as a jumping-off point for something of my own, but as soon as you say "my fabric line" or "this great pattern [only $25]" I start to wonder how badly I need whatever it is. Still the internet is such a golden tool -- remember having to visit craft shows and passing tons of burlap ribbon wreaths to find one good new idea? Now it's all at my fingertips. Thank you for being so clear about "influence" as a thing, and expressing your thoughts so well.

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  29. I come to your site as much for your commentary (on life and sewing), as for your actual makes. As usual, you hit the nail on the head with this post.

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  30. To me -- maybe it's just me -- I find most "influencers" of whatever ilk or breed are scam artists and/or extortionists. A vendor pays them "protection money" and they'll publish nice things about the vendor's products and services.

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  31. Amen, Amen, Amen!!! Whether its sewing blogs and socials or kitchen gadgets (95% of which I consider to be gimicks), my B.S. meter is set pretty high (or would it be low?). I get my take away from projects, fabrics, suggestions and reviews but not from all of the other stuff I'm promoted on blogs and socials. Once again you called it! Thanks Carolyn for telling it like it is!

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  32. I so relate to your comments on time being commodity and sewing as a hobby. For me sewing is my escape, creative outlet and self-care. I have a great job, it lets me finance my sewing :) I have zero desire turn my hobby into work. Your approach to sewing has always resonated with me. I started following you not long after I started sewing, back in your "corporate" days, and I always thought it was so cool that you could make all these wonderful garments that fit your work lifestyle. I saw what I wanted my sewing to be in what you were doing. I suppose you were an "influencer", but I think a more accurate term is mentor, which in my opinion, is much more valuable! :)

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  33. I learn from you. You inspire me. You set the standard for skilled sewing, that is, you show me what is possible, what I can strive for. I also love the deep thoughts you share, your personal history, and mind refreshment that you encourage, which nobody else can provide in the same way. I agree that sewing and sharing is a delight; it should never be a burden. I hope that the gift you give us simultaneously benefits you, and that that is why you do it— not as an obligation. Those “influencers” have a different goal. I think some of them they are trying to hustle a living without seeing many options available to them. I think it is difficult to earn a living that way, so I admire them for working so hard to shake that nickel tree. They probably aren’t having much fun. Some of them may learn enough to become accomplished, eventually. I am just making conjectures here. I am grateful for every one of your posts for as long as you are willing to publish them (forever, I hope)! Thank you, Carolyn!

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  34. Thanks for keeping me in the online sewing drama loop, LOL! I guess I don't follow enough people to catch things like this. But, maybe that's (your post) why I don't follow that many people!

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    1. Dana - I don't think of it as drama. It's a perspective on how online sewing is evolving. But no drama.

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  35. I am very new to garment sewing and the online sewing community, and I really appreciate this post - you've articulated so much of my discomfort with what I'm seeing on Instagram! I want to follow people who share their craft so I can improve mine, but so much of it feels like "buy this fabric from this fancy shop! make this trendy pattern while it's still on trend! style your photos!" All these rat-race-type feelings I have turned to sewing to escape from. Thank you for sharing your criteria, I will use it going forward. I'm off to dive into your archives now to learn more about being a thoughtful sewist.

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  36. wow. what a well- rounded look at the sewing influencer space! I do find that when the sewing space was more blogs and forums, , etc. I was able to level up my sewing much more through problem solving, books and instructor recs. I do feel I have to search further to find that now but as things change I suppose it’s up to use to figure out how we make the experience best for us. Thanks for sharing your take!
    Michelle
    @sewplaysew

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  37. Thanks for putting thoughts I've had for a while into writing. I find some of the most popular sewists really don't sew well! I will continue following sewists like you who have real knowledge about sewing and use it in creating their projects and share it in their posts.

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  38. Y'know...I follow people who influence me by their skill, their attitude, their transparency and their civility. I just wanted to thank you for being such a great influence! ;-)

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  39. Thank you for your thoughtful post, having very dreadful internet helps filter out to the most important (for me) blogs and vlogs. Recently I’ve even tired of many previously that I follow and your post has identified to me why. I love reading about your process and this has lead to a great improvement in my sewing.

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  40. Very thought-provoking post! I def miss the days when sewing online felt like people wanted to learn and grow. I just have to keep cultivating that for myself personally so that I don't get stagnant and/or lazy because I def know how easy it is to hide ill-fitting things in pics with certain angles. I try not to let myself fall into that, and that keeps the art of sewing pure for me. I fell in love with the craft FOR the craft and I hope to continue to honor it!

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  41. Well said! Sewing is definitely a hobby for me and not a second career. Authenticity matters.

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  42. Carolyn, I wish you had like button for the comments...I want to like all the comments made here! So heartening to know most people are getting it when the sewist fakers pretend how good they are.

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  43. I liked your comment 'have they read any sewing books?' The influencers disseminate information more about what they are hawking than useful sewing knowledge. It's a shame really. All the blogs I used to enjoy are mostly gone. Like someone else mentioned, I read you and Sunny Gal Sewing Studio on a regular basis. You are both real and knowledgeable and offer an interesting point of view. If you mention where you get fabric it's because you love it and want to pass on a new source. It's hard to trust people who are profiting from what they are recommending. Finish that amazing blouse. BTW I saw your photo of the grandchildren and I can't believe how big they've gotten. Time goes by quickly doesn't it?

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  44. I'm younger than you but at my age I have realized just how precious a commodity time is.

    There is a lot more selling vs sharing happening in the sewing world. On one hand I'm glad sewing of color have the opportunity and the platform but it makes my feed overwhelming. I think it's just the Era that we are in at the moment.

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  45. You know in my world we have people called SME's. Subject matter experts. I'm ready to drop the idea of influencers and only follow those I recognize as SME's. I'm grateful to you for your expertise and willingness to share. Sharing takes a lot of time. Thank you for your talent and skill as a teacher. I appreciate it.

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  46. What a frank and inspiring post which needs to be applauded for in-depth thought and integrity. Thank you Carolyn!

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  47. Hallo vanuit Nederland. Ik volg je weblog al jaren. Ter inspiratie, en je hebt mij vaak met inspiratie geholpen. En idd influencers kunnen ze zelf kleding maken? Vaak zie ik technieken, eigenlijk géén techniek, die ze gebruiken. Er is verschil tussen het maken van kleding. 1. Detail techniek. 2. Haute couture techniek. 3 custom made. 4. Zelf gemaakt op maat. Ikzelf gebruik verschillende technieken en dat zie ik jou ook doen. Ervaring hierin krijg je met de jaren. En dat is juist wat ik mis bij de influencers. Laten wij doorgaan met onze mooie hobby.

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    1. Here is the translation from Dutch to English from Tracey:
      Hello from the Netherlands. I've been following your blog for years. For inspiration, and you have often helped me with inspiration. And influencers can they make their own clothes? I often see techniques, not actually technology, that they use. There is a difference between making clothes. 1. Detail technique. 2. Haute couture technique. 3 custom made. 4. Self-made to measure. I myself use different techniques and I see you doing that too. You will gain experience in this over the years. And that is exactly what I miss with the influencers. Let's continue our beautiful hobby.

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    2. Thanks die the translation

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  48. I’m so out of the loop. Or maybe because I built my blog list off yours, Thomasa’s, and Peter’s blog rolls, and Instagram was born from that. Not everyone is as strongly SKILLED (myself at the front) but I haven’t encountered too many fake influencer types. So, inspiration AND fabric sources, the best things I got from the three of you and all the people you follow!

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  49. Everything you said makes so much sense and it applies in my case. I trust people like you because I can see your/their experience and heartfelt passion for the craft and feel a connection. I have recently unfollowed certain "influencers" because they look like they are just trying too hard and there is no substance. Maybe I am just an old fogey, but to me (sorry if this is harsh), they come off as desperate and kinda pathetic.

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  50. Hello I am so happy to read from you again. I missed your blogs. You are the only blog I follow. I am not affected by influencers although one or probably more takers and/or websites do go to my junk mail. I have always wanted to sew, since high school. I have always wanted to sew my own clothes. I have two beautiful sewing machines. I rip more than I sew. I am well over 60 and my tremors prohibit a clean line of stitch. I live in an area that does not promote suitable styles for my age and weight and body shape. In this area I am confined by Jo-Ann's or Walmart for material unless I buy online. I buy cotton or linen material at least once a year still. You are my influence, inspiration, outside connection. I am an earth sign grounded in solid royal colors and I honestly admire you, your material choices, love your patterns and styles and skills the most as well as your ability to create your own wardrobe. I am equally grateful you take the time and effort to share your amazing talent and experiences. I am convinced to hoard all freebies as well as boasting oneselves influence online is a result of an irreconcilable psychological ailment for which I personally haven't the time nor interest. Remember your umbrella, and let the sh!t roll off, You are perfect just the way you are.

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  51. LOUDER! I absolutely love this post because it mirrors what I've been saying for months now. Is anybody still sewing because they enjoy it? Where is the passion and respect for the craft? They're out here influencing with uneven hemlines and seams that need to ironed...and I just cringe. Thank you for your authenticity...its a breath of fresh air! ��

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  52. **need to be ironed. (:

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  53. This really rings a bell with me. I still love following talented sewists who sew, particularly if they show the nice sewn details. And I like seeing new sewists try new skills and test themselves. But I quickly lose interest when it turns influencer-ish or someone posts a tutorial or review of something they just learned or are using for the first time. It's painfully obvious to experienced sewers. And I really lose interest with "lifestyle" content. Women have enough people telling them how they should be living their lives - I don't need to invite that into my feed.

    I would never call you an "influencer," which definitely has the connotations you've outlined. You are influential, which IMHO is way better.

    (Tried to comment from a device but not sure it went thru. Sorry if I double comment.)

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  54. I don't really have anything to add. I follow people who inspire me and unfollow them when I lose interest in them. I really just wanted to say your shirt is stunning to the point where I am inspired to look for something to sew again.

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  55. Carolyn, this kind of clear-eyed analysis is why I value your voice here and on instagram. I enjoy Instagram, but it feels so frenetic most of the time. I definitely miss when blogs were a main venue for interaction online. With Instagram, I feel bombarded and so much of it is not topical to me. I definitely feel old friend feelings for the IG folks I followed as bloggers. I understand that many are trying to make an income at the influencer trade and that is a tough hustle. I respect their chutzpah but often not their skills. However, I am an old sewist who has my own quirky way of going about things since I was mainly self taught in the days of books and magazines (lol), and this old dog has learned some new tricks from the social media sewing room. But I am mainly there and here for community and the great joy of knowing others who sew because most of my sewing life, I didn't personally know anyone my age who did. I hope whatever is keeping you from sewing subsides and you can return to your sewing loft. I definitely miss you when you aren't posting.

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  56. My thoughts exactly.....thanks for stating them so well.

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  57. First, finish that shirt. It is exquisite and not even done!!! Now,,,,, OMG, you took the words right out of my head. You articulated them so perfectly as well. I can't tell you how many times I have heard a very very new sewist say they are starting a design collection and working on their brand. Oh, and they have been sewing under a year or not at all and could you please show me how to put these two collar pieces together because I just don't get it. What is the motivation? All I see is the word you used, FAMOUS. I see no desire to learn this art, as you so correctly described what we do. I see no passion or love of the needle and all it's peripherals. It's all about what can get me a few minutes of social time with more likes and then a ticket to the big bucks on youtube. It's disgusting. I have hated that word influencer since first hearing it because, I bet like you, nobody influences this babe unless she wants to be influenced and that is a very limited group with that power and they wouldn't even think of calling themselves influencers. Accckkkkkk, this is such a wonderful art form, such a personal expression of ourselves that we put out there every day when we wear our results. We don't need people to influence us; inform, update, care, yes, but those "I" people and those straining to be "I" people are just about themselves, their "I" as they try to mess with me and my "I". I wish they would just learn to sew well with great fabric and show us the results, period. Then I'll look and listen.

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  58. I just want to sew, I'm not that bothered about fancy pictures or bloggers who try to make a name for themselves, especially if they start selling stuff. I like to see where they sew, what they sew. Your blog fills the need completely and I see you as friendly face who is normal. I bob in and out, usually when I'm having problems with my own sewing, something not going right. I also love hearing about your life. I am so nosey:)

    Long may you continue.

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  59. You are one who influences me.
    I'm emboldened to make pattern mods because I see you doing it.
    I've got the interfacing people you support bookmarked.
    I go to the vendors/creators of patterns you make.
    Thank you.

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  60. Very timely blog post for me. . . been culling what I watch and read regarding sewing "experts". . .I had FaceBook for a whole 3 months in 2009 and decided I didn't like it and got rid of it! Don't do any social media except PR, if that counts. I may not be an "expert sewist", but I know it when I see someone post on YT or a blog whether or not they have anything to teach me because I am obsessed with reading about sewing and have an entire bookcase dedicated to my craft/hobby. It is painful to watch and read some videos or blogs and not want to post a comment pointing out a discrepancy or explain a process that could be executed much better if done a different way, if they only knew. . . Or suggest a book that would show or explain a technique much better than what they're demonstrating. I suppose I sound condescending, but I truly love well executed sewing projects and appreciate the time to make things beautiful and very few sewists do that well. . .

    Thank you for taking the time to make the world a little more beautiful with your well thought-out, well executed sewing projects. . .

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  61. Love, love, love this post! I'm selective as to who I follow because I want to learn how to do things the correct way and not the fastest way. Thanks for your thoughtful post!

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  62. I 100 percent feel the same way. I haven't been blogging much (but have posted outfits on the 'gram). I am practicing attorney so I only sew, knit, spin and weave for fun and fun only. I feel that if I have to post something it would exhaust me and it would become a business to me. Hats off to those making it work -- but I do think it takes (or can take) some of the fun out of it. That said, around 2012 I thought about manufacturing my own jeans (I live in LA where there is access to manufacturing) but never seriously pursued. I agree with you thoughts wholeheartedly -- and love the shirt!

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