Thursday, May 29, 2014

Vogue 8995 - Construction Details

First I need to say that my alterations worked using the smaller of the waistline inserts...and I was totally thrilled!  I will make a note on the file folder so that I know for the future which version of the pattern piece to use when I make this dress again...because yes I will be making this again!!!

Working with the pattern pieces was like putting a jigsaw puzzle together. I had to fiddle with the side pieces a little before I could get them to work together well. Then I basted all of the pieces together to get a visual and to see if the sizing was right.



Again it worked...*sigh of relief*...so the basted dress was taken apart and I started to add the piping to all of the seams.

Adding the piping ~
The part that makes the dress sing is the white piping...which took quite a bit of work because each piece of piping had to be pressed flat, then hand stitched to the seam prior to stitching the seams together. Finally I added a little topstitching on the top of the seam to insure that the seam stayed flat. 

Let's not forget the pressing time needed to insure that all the seams were laid flat, as well as, a little heat and pressure to make sure the joins weren't bulky.

As previously stated, piping was added to every seam, as well as, the neckline and the sleeve hems. For the piping at the sleeve hems, I added a band to the bottom of the sleeve hem for a clean finish.


Adding piping to dress front

Adding piping to front seam with the join

For how I add piping to a seam, please check this post. I wrote this back in 2008 and I still add piping the same way.

Other construction info. ~
The pattern instructions tell you to cut the lining pieces from the same pattern pieces that you use to make the dress. I've never understood that. Personally I want a lining to cover the seaming, not compete with/rub against it, and is smooth next to my body. So I did what's considered a no-no and cut the lining from the front and the back dress pieces. 

I understand the reasoning, not wanting the lining to be distorted by using the fashion fabric as the pattern. I've just never had a problem when I've chosen to go this route. However, I'm not encouraging you to follow in my rebellious footsteps!



There were three choices in my lining stash that I could have used for the lining.  I went with the nude lining because it wasn't as opaque as the white and the green made the fashion fabric look weird. It's a straight forward lining. No lace at the hemline, just a double stitched hem.



Otherwise, the construction was pretty straightforward. I didn't need the pattern instructions after completing the dress front. Although the pattern tells you to line the sleeves, my personal preference is unlined so that's how I sewed them.

Conclusion ~
I love the detailing on this dress. All of the additional time and work needed to add the piping was so worth it. The embellishment really gives the dress that extra special something.


Close up of the piping on the neckline & front of the dress

Piping and banded hemline on the sleeve

Here is a picture of several pieces of the dress with the piping added...

So the final post about this dress will be the reveal...I have to admit that all of the work was worth it...the finished dress is pretty awesome.

From the Vault ~
The young me as a senior in high school. I was 18 years old. The white dress photo is from my Debutante Ball, the suit my Easter Outfit that year made by me, the center pic is of me and my cousin after church at his "Going To The Army" party. Gawd, I was thin wasn't I?



...as always more later!!!

28 comments:

  1. Your dress is gorgeous! The piping makes the dress extra special.

    ReplyDelete
  2. That's great news Carolyn! The piping details sure do look great.... now I can't wait for the big reveal :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love the light piping against the main fabric - it looks great! Piping is one of the techniques I haven't tried yet, but I'm hoping to use it on a shift dress I'm planning to make soon. Thanks for sharing your notes on making this dress!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Can't wait to see the whole dress - it's looking pretty awesome

    ReplyDelete
  5. i wish i could move in with you for one of your sewing weekends/vacay for some intensive training. (is that slightly stalkerish?) your finishing is amazing and your attention to detail is so impressive. I am always impressed by your work and really look up to you as a sewing role model. I am desperate to figure out what my own TNT patterns will be...it's taking a lot longer than i thought it would! can't wait to see this beauty on you!

    -dani e

    ReplyDelete
  6. Looks amazing but may i ask what type of piping you use , ready made or do you make it yourself . Its always good to learn from the master and you are one indeed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks but seriously I'm no master! *LOL* A little piping obsessed though! This piping is store bought. I buy mine from Daytona Trimmings in NYC.- they have an array of piping - fabric covered, satin covered, and corded which is what I like. The phone number to the store is: 212.354.1713. Maybe they can ship some to you.

      Delete
  7. Ooooh, on tenterhooks for the big reveal post! The piping really makes this dress something special. Love the old photos, it's so nice to have them to look back on.

    ReplyDelete
  8. The piping is fantastic, makes the dress go up another level in terms of design and finish. Congratulations on a beautiful and technical make.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Love this pattern, love your piping and love those great pics of you over the years. You're helping me get my sewing mojo back......slowly.....

    ReplyDelete
  10. I love your dress and it's so well executed! I also agree with your nearly seamless lining but I will say that making a muslin would have been an easier route considering you had to pull out the seam stitches to insert the piping. That said, I'm a muslin gal when I'm working on a new pattern that is quite different from my TNTs. I'm not trying to convert you, Carolyn, just sharing my viewpoint.

    Karen

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Karen - no need to worry...I'm firmly in the no muslin making camp! *LOL* However, I definitely support your choice to make one!

      Delete
  11. So fun Carolyn!! This is going to be a great spring dress!!!

    ReplyDelete
  12. What an amazing spring dress. The piping is perfect and takes it to another level. Waiting for the reveal.

    ReplyDelete
  13. what a lovely spring dress, perfect and great colors.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Debutante Ball! How fancy! And your Easter suit looks amazing! I'm so excited by this dress! Show it to us already! ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. S - it sounds fancier than it actually was! But it made my Mother happy and it looked good on my college applications!

      Delete
  15. Carolyn your dress looks amazing! Question for you, I see that you serge all the pieces prior to construction. So do you just press the seams open once constructed, no trimming? I think I remember you talking about this before, but I cannot for the life of me remember which post.
    ~Renae

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, I'm one of those people who serges her cut pieces of fabric prior to sewing them together. However, I've just never had a good experience serging them after the seam has been sewn. One disasterous hole after another has scarred me! So I serge all my pieces, stitch the seams and press them flat and then open.

      Delete
  16. I think home seamstresses sometimes make things more difficult than they need to be. Your lining is made very similarly to how I was taught to make a lining in fashion school, for the same reasons you stated. Very beautiful dress, I can't wait to see photos of you in it!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Replies
    1. I sure hope you're not disappointed by the reveal! I mean it's a nice dress but not earth shattering! *LOL*

      Delete
  18. I would be afraid that the lining would not have enough 'shape' as it lacks the 'darts' which are hidden in the design's seams. I like the idea of making the lining not have the same seams, I might have used a TNT sheath pattern for the lining, so it would be a little more fitted. I think a slightly more fitted lining would contribute to the final appearance of the garment when you wear it. I could be wrong, too. What you do works beautifully for you, I am always impressed with your results!

    ReplyDelete
  19. Beautiful. Love the piping.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Looking lovely Carolyn. Can't wait for the final reveal.

    ReplyDelete
  21. The piping just makes the whole dress!!! It is beautiful! You sure were a young thin chick in those photos! Neat glimpses from your past!!!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Ooh, piping! Can't wait to see the finished dress.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Hi Carolyn - I just love your blog and your detailed posts. I always learn something new. I am looking forward to seeing this dress modeled, as the touches of piping and color are really scrumptious! - N

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment! It is so appreciated.

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails